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Decisions
RW and RadioWorks Ltd - 2008-111
2008-111

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(ii) of the Broadcasting Act 1989 The Edge – broadcast conversation with listener – hosts had told listener that she was not on air – broadcast her cellphone number – listener complained that broadcast breached her privacy and was unfair – broadcaster upheld the complaint – action taken allegedly insufficient Findings Standard 3 (privacy) – action taken insufficient – upheld Standard 6 (fairness) – action taken insufficient – upheld Order Section 13(1)(d) – payment to the complainant for breach of privacy $1,500 This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] On Wednesday 27 August 2008 on The Edge radio station, a telephone conversation between the hosts and a listener was broadcast between 5pm and 6pm. The listener expressed concern that the hosts were making inappropriate remarks about people from other countries, such as India and America....

Decisions
Beston and The RadioWorks Waikato - 1998-157
1998-157

SummaryAn episode of a popular sitcom, in which a character was portrayed using his former girlfriend’s name when taking his marriage vows, was discussed on The Edge at 7. 30am on 20 August 1998. Listeners were invited to discuss what they would do in a similar situation. One male caller said "I’d give her a slap around", to which the host DJ responded "That’s a bit rough mate, isn’t it?"Ms Beston complained to the RadioWorks Waikato, the broadcaster, that the exchange was offensive, and contended that the DJ’s casual response had tacitly condoned violence against women. In her view, the call should have been terminated before the comments were broadcast. She sought an apology from the station. In response, The RadioWorks advised that it considered the host’s response was a natural one which had not in any way endorsed the statement made by the caller....

Decisions
J and The Radioworks Ltd - 1999-024, 1999-025
1999-024–025

Summary A radio station announcer, claiming he was doing a survey on STDs, telephoned a woman and asked a number of personal and intimate questions. The call was broadcast live on The Edge on 30 November 1998 at about 4. 00pm. J, the woman who received the call, had identified herself using her first name and employer’s name. She complained to the station that the call was a serious invasion of her privacy as she was never told that the caller was from a radio station, or that it was being broadcast live. J said the comments ranged from being personal to obscene, and cited some examples. When the matter was referred to the station initially, J received an apology both from the station manager and the announcer....

Decisions
Christini and RadioWorks Ltd - 2009-142
2009-142

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(i) of the Broadcasting Act 1989The Edge – song called “Fuck You” by Lily Allen was broadcast during the afternoon – the “F” in “fuck” was muted – host explained that the word obscured in the song began with “f” and ended in “u, c, k” – allegedly in breach of good taste and decency and responsible programming Findings Standard 1 (good taste and decency) – “fuck” inadequately censored – use of the expletive during children’s normally accepted listening times unacceptable – host’s spelling out of the word “fuck” irresponsible – upheld Standard 8 (responsible programming) – broadcaster was not sufficiently mindful of the effect the programme content would have on children – upheld No Order This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] A song titled “Fuck You” by singer Lily Allen was broadcast on The Edge at 3....

Decisions
Bannatyne and The RadioWorks Ltd - 2002-055
2002-055

ComplaintThe Edge – listeners asked to call station mid afternoon – hot topic – frequency of sex – reference to self pleasure and pain of some sexual experiences – offensive and inappropriate for children – recommended uphold by broadcaster as inappropriate for children – Principle 7 and guideline 7a – announcer spoken to FindingsPrinciple 1 – adult topic during children’s normal viewing times – context and Bill of Rights – no uphold Principle 7 guideline 7a – agree with broadcaster’s recommendation – uphold – no order This headnote does not form part of the decision. Summary [1] The frequency of sex was the "hot topic" for the listener phone-in programme broadcast by The Edge from 4. 05pm on 29 November 2001. One caller asked if the topic included self-pleasure, and another said frequent or long sexual encounters could be painful....

Decisions
Smith and The RadioWorks Ltd - 2002-026
2002-026

ComplaintThe Edge – announcer makes anonymous call to woman – purports to be buying magazines – says has fetish for "shirtless Papua New Guinea women" – threatening and offensive – breach of good taste and decency FindingsPrinciple 1 – sinister – threatening – breach of good taste and decency – uphold OrderBroadcast of summary – costs of $500 to Crown This headnote does not form part of the decision. Summary [1] During a broadcast on The Edge on 17 October 2001 between 9. 30am and 10. 00am, one of the announcers telephoned a woman who was advertising National Geographic magazines, purporting to be a potential buyer. He told the woman he had a fetish for "topless Papua New Guinea women" and requested copies of the magazines carrying such pictures....

Decisions
Jones, on behalf of Otago Rural Police of Queenstown, and The RadioWorks Ltd - 2001-117
2001-117

Complaint The Edge – radio announcer challenged two men to run naked down a main street – offensive behaviour – incited breach of law FindingsPrinciple 2 – no evidence that broadcaster encouraged disrespect for law – no uphold This headnote does not form part of the decision. Summary An announcer on The Edge challenged two men to run naked down a main street in Queenstown. The event was broadcast live on The Edge (a radio network) at about 7. 30am on 25 May 2001. Inspector Phil Jones, the Area Controller for the Otago Rural Police in Queenstown, complained to The RadioWorks Ltd, the broadcaster, that the behaviour which he said had been "incited" by the announcer, was "unacceptable". The RadioWorks did not uphold the complaint....

Decisions
Davidson, on behalf of Aotea College, and The RadioWorks Ltd - 2001-116
2001-116

ComplaintThe Edge – comments about Aotea College students – two references to "burning the place down" – reference to breathalysing students – ill-informed, harmful and malicious FindingsPrinciple 5 – misdirected humour – negative comments – borderline – no uphold This headnote does not form part of the decision. Summary Comments about Aotea College students, made in the course of a discussion about a secondary school stage competition, were broadcast on The Edge (a radio network) on 30 May 2001 between 3. 00pm and 7. 00pm. The announcer twice asked whether students from Aotea College had burned the venue down, and also asked if they had been breathalysed at the door. Julia Davidson, the principal of Aotea College complained to The RadioWorks Ltd, the broadcaster, that the comments were ill-informed, harmful and malicious. The RadioWorks did not uphold the complaint....

Decisions
Yates and The RadioWorks Ltd - 2002-099
2002-099

ComplaintThe Edge – interview – impersonation of Jeremy Yates – cyclist banned for bad language – interview apparently with Jeremy Yates used offensive language which was beeped out – unfair – misleading – encourages discrimination and denigration FindingsPrinciple 5 – not obviously a spoof – wrong brother the target for the prank – uphold Principle 7 guideline 7a – no group denigrated – no uphold No Order This headnote does not form part of the decision. Summary [1] Cyclist Jeremy Yates was banned from participating in events by Cycling NZ for using bad language and displaying bad behaviour. An interview, apparently with Jeremy Yates, was broadcast during the breakfast show on The Edge on 11 April 2002. During the interview, the interviewee frequently used offensive language, which was "beeped out", and expressed displeasure that the broadcaster was not supporting him in his dispute with Cycling NZ....

Decisions
Glen and MediaWorks Radio Ltd - 2021-128 ( 20 December 2021)
2021-128

An announcer on The Edge Breakfast recounted an experience at her antenatal class where she discussed how to address constipation post childbirth. The complaint was this segment breached the good taste and decency and children’s interests standards. The Authority did not uphold the complaint, taking into account the programme’s target audience, audience expectations, and the low-level language complained about (being of an anatomical, rather than a profane or sexual nature). Not Upheld: Good Taste and Decency and Children’s Interests...

Decisions
Gibson and RadioWorks Ltd - 2010-020
2010-020

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(i) of the Broadcasting Act 1989The Edge Morning Madhouse – host referred to George Michael as a “homo” – allegedly in breach of discrimination and denigration FindingsStandard 7 (discrimination and denigration) – standard applies to sections of the community – host’s comment did not encourage denigration or discrimination – not upheld This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] During The Edge Morning Madhouse programme, broadcast on The Edge on the morning of Friday 5 February 2010, one of the hosts, Dom, had to guess which celebrity his co-host and wife, JJ, would leave him for. Dom’s guess was incorrect, but JJ’s best friend guessed correctly that JJ was thinking of singer George Michael. Dom remarked, “But he’s a homo!” and JJ responded, “I know he’s gay, but if he went straight I’d so be there”....

Decisions
Simmons and Walker-Simmons and RadioWorks Ltd - 2012-004
2012-004

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(i) of the Broadcasting Act 1989The Edge Morning Show – host read out a listener’s text message: “Dom, your song was so gay I’m pretty sure I just got AIDS from listening to it” – allegedly in breach of good taste and decency, accuracy and discrimination and denigration standards FindingsStandard 1 (good taste and decency) – some listeners would have considered the connection made between homosexuals and AIDS to be offensive and in poor taste – however, in light of the relevant contextual factors such as the target audience and their expectations of content on The Edge, the potential harm to listeners did not outweigh the broadcaster’s right to freedom of expression – not upheld Standard 7 (discrimination and denigration) – the content of the text message was directed at the host’s song and was not intended as a criticism of homosexuality or as an attack against homosexual people…...

Decisions
Anderson and MediaWorks Radio Ltd - 2017-094 (2 March 2018)
2017-094

Summary[This summary does not form part of the decision. ]During a segment broadcast on The Edge, the radio hosts made several references to the names ‘Mark Hunt’ and ‘Mike Hunt’, with the apparent intention to imply the phrase, ‘my c***’. The Authority did not uphold a complaint that this conversation breached the good taste and decency standard. The Authority found that, while the conversation was gratuitous and immature, the hosts did not explicitly use the phrase, and the segment as a whole was not so extreme or offensive that it went beyond audience expectations of The Edge radio station. The Authority also declined to uphold the complaint under the children’s interests standard, finding children were unlikely to understand the conversation, mitigating the broadcast’s potential harm....

Decisions
de Villiers and RadioWorks Ltd - 2010-004
2010-004

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(i) of the Broadcasting Act 1989The Edge Morning Madhouse – host broadcast phone calls recorded at 3. 30am Australian time to Australian residents with horse racing-related surnames to ask for betting tips for the Melbourne Cup – allegedly in breach of privacy and good taste and decency Findings Standard 1 (good taste and decency) – childish prank intended to be humorous – did not threaten standards of good taste and decency – not upheld Standard 3 (privacy) – people phoned were not identifiable – no private facts disclosed – not upheld This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] During The Edge Morning Madhouse, broadcast on The Edge on the morning of Tuesday 3 November, one of the hosts noted that the Melbourne Cup was “the race that stops the nation”, but questioned whether it might be “the race that wakes the nation”....

Decisions
Madden and MediaWorks Radio Ltd - 2016-055 (14 October 2016)
2016-055

Summary[This summary does not form part of the decision. ]During The Edge’s Smash! 20 countdown show, a caller successfully answered a series of questions based on the songs in the countdown and won a prize. While taking the caller’s personal details, the announcer left the phone channel in ‘on-air’ mode and inadvertently broadcast the caller’s full name, address, school, date of birth and mobile number. The Authority upheld a complaint that the broadcast breached the caller’s privacy. The caller was clearly identifiable and disclosed a high level of personal detail on air, over which she had a reasonable expectation of privacy. The Authority acknowledged the caller’s disclosure was the result of an unfortunate technical error on the announcer’s part, and that the broadcaster took immediate actions to respond to the breach. The Authority did not make any order in these circumstances....

Decisions
Bland and Energy Enterprises, The Edge (Rock 93FM) - 1995-010
1995-010

BEFORE THE BROADCASTING STANDARDS AUTHORITY Decision No: 10/95 Dated the 23rd day of February 1995 IN THE MATTER of the Broadcasting Act 1989 AND IN THE MATTER of a complaint by EDWARD and DIANNE BLAND of Huntly Broadcaster THE EDGE (ROCK 93FM) of Hamilton I W Gallaway Chairperson J R Morris L M Loates W J Fraser...

Decisions
EF and CanWest RadioWorks Ltd - 2006-112
2006-112

Complaint under section 8(1)(c) of the Broadcasting Act 1989 The Edge – anonymous caller revealed that named person had visited a medical clinic – disclosed confidential medical details – allegedly in breach of privacy Findings Principle 3 (privacy) – highly offensive disclosure of private facts – upheld Order Section 13(1)(d) – payment to the complainant for breach of privacy $5,000 Section 16(1) – payment of costs to the complainant $2,067 Section 16(4) – payment of costs to the Crown $5,000 This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] On the afternoon of Monday 9 October 2006, the hosts on The Edge radio station stated that they had “a bit of inside goss” from an anonymous caller who had previously worked at a medical centre for two weeks. The hosts asked “are you breaking patient confidentiality here or something?” to which the caller laughed....

Decisions
Robinson and RadioWorks Ltd - 2010-037
2010-037

Complaint under section 8(1B)(b)(i) of the Broadcasting Act 1989The Edge Morning Madhouse – host sang jingle about a public figure being “into ladies” – included phrases, “when they make love do they have to put a strap on it”, she “wanted to go rug munching” and she “got sick of dicks” – broadcaster upheld complaint under good taste and decency – action taken allegedly insufficientFindingsStandard 1 (good taste and decency) – song lyrics were unacceptable for broadcast at 8. 20am – serious breach of good taste and decency – action taken by broadcaster was insufficient – upheld OrdersSection 16(4) – costs to the Crown $2,000 This headnote does not form part of the decision. Broadcast [1] At 8....

Decisions
Voogt and Television New Zealand Ltd - 1994-075
1994-075

BEFORE THE BROADCASTING STANDARDS AUTHORITY Decision No: 75/94 Dated the 1st day of September 1994 IN THE MATTER of the Broadcasting Act 1989 AND IN THE MATTER of a complaint by A. VOOGT of Hamilton Broadcaster TELEVISION NEW ZEALAND LIMITED I W Gallaway Chairperson J R Morris R A Barraclough L M Loates...

Decisions
Malcolm and RadioWorks Ltd - 2003-007, 2003-008
2003-007–008

Complaint The Edge – caller to station advised that she had unwittingly committed incest and sought assistance with advising half-brother – caller telephoned her half-brother on-air advising him of their relationship – highly sensitive material – breach of privacy – releasing information offensive – no tape FindingsPrinciple 1 Guideline 1a – despite time for reflection, broadcaster proceeded with the broadcast of very sensitive information for entertainment purposes – upholdPrinciple 3 – privacy – consent from one party Privacy Principle (vii) – no uphold – no identification of the other – no uphold OrderBroadcast of statement This headnote does not form part of the decision Summary [1] "Cleaning Out Your Closet" was the name of a competition run by The Edge, a radio station, in which callers speak about something they want to get off their chest. At about 5....

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